Using Food and Nutrition to Boost Energy Levels

It should be no surprise that what we eat makes a massive difference to our energy levels. After all, food is our fuel. Using the knowledge and theories of Chinese Medicine, it is possible to determine the best energy-boosting foods for our own circumstances.According to Chinese medicine, our day to day Qi energy is derived from the Qi of the foods we consume. We wouldn’t dream of putting the wrong kind of fuel into our cars, yet we regularly try to fuel ourselves with inappropriate foods. Our own Qi then suffers as a result of the poor quality Qi we consume, leaving us weak, tired, with poor immunity and at increased risk of degenerative diseases.Fresh Organic Ingredients:The more we process a food the more we damage its Qi. Extended storage also depletes the Qi of foods. It stands to reason that fresh, organic food has a stronger ‘life force’ than old, processed food. Additionally, there is little or no useful Qi in artificial additives, preservatives etc, and these substances can be harmful in themselves.


So, opting for unprocessed, fresh organic produce as much as possible will provide your body with far more nourishment than heavily processed, pre-packaged foods. This means cooking from scratch with natural ingredients as much as possible.Protein:Naturally, it is sensible to eat a wide range of different foods to ensure that you are getting all the nutrients you need. If you are vegetarian, make sure you are getting enough protein, as protein deficiency can leave you feeling very weak and tired. Good sources of protein include most beans, peas and nuts. Grains contain moderate levels of protein, with amaranth and quinoa having the most. Most seaweed contains high levels of protein, especially nori.The micro-algaes chlorella and spirulina are exceptionally high in good quality protein – they are both classed as Qi and Blood tonics in Chinese medicine. They are available as powders or capsules from health food and supplement suppliers, and can be useful for anyone who is concerned about their protein intake.If you eat meat, do not eat too much at once. Meat is a very strengthening, provided it can be digested, but too much in one go puts a big strain on the system. Small amounts can be used in stews, casseroles, soups or stir-fries.Eat At The Right Time:


We can also help our digestion by always eating breakfast and not eating too much too late in the evening (the digestion is at its strongest between 7 and 11 am and at its weakest between 7 and 11 pm.) Eating breakfast gives us the energy we need for the start of the day, and stimulates the metabolism. A low sugar, carbohydrate rich breakfast such as porridge will keep your energy levels up through the morning.The Qi tonicsCertain foods are known to be especially good at boosting energy levels – these are the Qi tonics. They include many kinds of meats, grains and root vegetables. For instance, Oats, Chicken, Carrot and Sweet potato are all very good energy-boosters. Which foods are most suitable depends on your exact symptoms – a Chinese Nutritionist will be able to help you with this.